Operations Research

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  • what Punk Rock OR is reading

    Punk Rock Operations Research
    Laura McLay
    3 Jul 2015 | 6:53 am
    Have a wonderful Fourth of July weekend! The queen of college tours: a post by Bill Cook about the TSP and how to solve it. When maps lie: a fascinating read about geography and map literacy How analytics transformed the NBA An overpass built for a bear Finding the beauty in optimization models: visualizing MPS files by Imre Polik at SAS. I also found a 1987 paper by Irv Lustig [pdf] that does just that using old school tools.
  • John Nash's Last Book and the Operations Research Connections via Greece

    RENeW
    3 Jul 2015 | 2:20 am
    Our terrific Dynamics of Disasters conference, which took place in Kalamata, Greece, in now over. It was such a pleasure working on this conference with my fellow co-organizers, Professor Panos M. Pardalos and Professor Ilias Kotsireas.While there, I learned of some quite surprising news,which further supports the small world hypothesis (at least when it comes to our terrfic operations research community).While at one of our nice get-togethers at the conference (I have posted many photos on the blog in previous posts), we reinisced about John Nash, the Nobel laureate, who tragically died in a…
  • Prescriptive analytics, the next big step?

    OR at Work
    21 Jun 2015 | 9:49 am
    Now that you have hooked all the data of your organisation to your KPI dashboard to monitor every day performance and are busy estimating forecasting models for order intake and customer satisfaction, you’re wondering what will be your next step in analytics. Should it be prescriptive analytics? It’s the most advanced, most promising variant of analytics, at least that’s what vendors of analytics software are saying, but it is also the most demanding.  Reviewing the literature on analytics you deduct that the only way to be able to use prescriptive…
  • Associative Computing, Computer Science Department: Research Papers, at Kent State University

    WordPress Tag: Operations Research
    Darrell Ulm
    25 Jun 2015 | 3:36 pm
    Includes Papers co-authored by Darrell Ulm on Parallel Computation Includes papers of Darrell Ulm, and others, authored while at Kent State University.
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    Punk Rock Operations Research

  • what Punk Rock OR is reading

    Laura McLay
    3 Jul 2015 | 6:53 am
    Have a wonderful Fourth of July weekend! The queen of college tours: a post by Bill Cook about the TSP and how to solve it. When maps lie: a fascinating read about geography and map literacy How analytics transformed the NBA An overpass built for a bear Finding the beauty in optimization models: visualizing MPS files by Imre Polik at SAS. I also found a 1987 paper by Irv Lustig [pdf] that does just that using old school tools.
  • happy belated anniversary operations research and management science!

    Laura McLay
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:46 am
    A recent literature review turned up a reference to a classic 1981 paper by Marshall Fisher that introduced Lagrangian relaxation. I was surprised to note a 2004 publication date and upon further analysis, I noticed that the paper was republished in 2004 in a special issue of Management Science devoted to the ten most influential papers in the journal’s first 50 years. I didn’t have a blog in December 2004 when the issue came out, so I am going to wish Management Science a belated anniversary 10.5 years later. The list of papers is pretty amazing. It includes: Linear…
  • what Punk Rock OR is reading

    Laura McLay
    22 Jun 2015 | 7:50 am
    Here are a few things I am reading: How an economist helped patients find the right kidney donors: an NPR article about Nobel Laureate Al Roth’s work in matching markets The unreasonable effectiveness of Random Forests. Anna Nagurney’s post on why she has fallen in love with Sweden. What it’s like as a “girl” in the lab: from the New York Times. Math-inspired art from Wired includes Bob Bosch’s TSP art Make craftier engineers: Why students should learn to sew in STEM classes Yes, androids dream of electric sheep – a Guardian article about how Google…
  • my national academies committee experience & risk-based flood insurance

    Laura McLay
    19 Jun 2015 | 8:51 am
    I had the pleasure of serving on a National Academies committee the past two years. Our report entitled “Tying flood insurance to flood risk for low-lying structures in the floodplain” was just released [Link]. If you don’t know much about the National Academies, it is a private, independent, nonprofit institution that provides technical expertise to important societal problems (engineering, in my case). The National Academies committees like the one I participated in address a specific challenge and has a very specific charge. The committee is composed of a bunch of really smart…
  • aviation security: is more really more?

    Laura McLay
    3 Jun 2015 | 7:44 am
    Aviation security has been in the news this week after ABC released a report suggesting that 95% of explosives go undetected when passengers go through checkpoint screening at airports. There are several operations research challenges in passenger screening that address how the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) can set up, staff, and use its limited resources for screening passengers. My advisor Sheldon Jacobson has been working on aviation security issued since 1996 (!) and has amassed a large number of papers on passenger and baggage screening. His work provides the…
 
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    RENeW

  • John Nash's Last Book and the Operations Research Connections via Greece

    3 Jul 2015 | 2:20 am
    Our terrific Dynamics of Disasters conference, which took place in Kalamata, Greece, in now over. It was such a pleasure working on this conference with my fellow co-organizers, Professor Panos M. Pardalos and Professor Ilias Kotsireas.While there, I learned of some quite surprising news,which further supports the small world hypothesis (at least when it comes to our terrfic operations research community).While at one of our nice get-togethers at the conference (I have posted many photos on the blog in previous posts), we reinisced about John Nash, the Nobel laureate, who tragically died in a…
  • Photos from Our Great Dynamics of Disasters Banquet in Greece

    2 Jul 2015 | 2:16 am
    Conferences are places where you reconnect with friends from around the world, make new ones, exchange ideas, and have memories to treasure of new experiences.Last night we held the gala banquet for our Dynamics of Disasters conference in Kalamata, Greece.This conference has been taking place during a historic week for Greece because of the financial debt crisis and the euro.Conversations on this topic have permeated the conference although its focus was primarily natural disasters. This conference brought together researchers and practitioners from the US, Canada, Denmark, Sweden, Greece,…
  • Crisis in Greece but Dynamics of Disasters Conference Goes On!

    1 Jul 2015 | 7:59 am
    The debt crisis in Greece is top news all around the world. The past two evenings, for example, BBC had over 30 minutes of coverage on the topic beginning at 10PM. The New York Times even has an article on the brain drain in Greece, which I am well aware of, given the outflow of professionals, including academics.This is also the period that our Dynamics of Disasters conference is taking place in Kalamata, Greece. I thank all of my OR/MS colleagues for messages of concern. It has been a very interesting time (and I have been to Greece for conferences both last summer and the summer before).It…
  • Photos and Some Highlights of Dynamics of Disasters Conference in Greece

    30 Jun 2015 | 8:50 am
    Today was the second day of the International Conference on Dynamics of Disasters, which is taking place in Kalamata, Greece, and which I co-organized with Professor Panos M. Pardalos of the University of Florida and Professor Ilias Kotsireas of Wilfrid Laurier in Canada. Below joining us in the photo are Professor Aleskerov of Russia and Professor Burcu Balcik of Turkey.This focused conference has had paper presenters from Denmark, England, Canada, the US, Russia, Sweden, Greece, Austria, Turkey, among other countries, which speaks to the timeliness and importance of the conference themes,…
  • First Review of Our Book, Networks Against Time: Supply Chain Analytics for Perishable Products, and It Is Great!

    25 Jun 2015 | 4:35 pm
    In my previous blogpost, I wrote about books that I am reading this summer, and I mentioned that one of the books that I had read (all 21 chapters of it) was the Handbook of Global Logistics, edited by James H. Bookbinder. I reviewed this book for the European Journal of Operational Research.Authors always anxiously await reviews of their books and I certainly am no different.My most recent book (I am writing another one), which was published by Springer in 2013, is Networks Against Time: Supply Chain Analytics for Perishable Products. It was co-authored with two of my former doctoral…
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    OR at Work

  • Prescriptive analytics, the next big step?

    21 Jun 2015 | 9:49 am
    Now that you have hooked all the data of your organisation to your KPI dashboard to monitor every day performance and are busy estimating forecasting models for order intake and customer satisfaction, you’re wondering what will be your next step in analytics. Should it be prescriptive analytics? It’s the most advanced, most promising variant of analytics, at least that’s what vendors of analytics software are saying, but it is also the most demanding.  Reviewing the literature on analytics you deduct that the only way to be able to use prescriptive…
  • There is more to analytics than just fishing in the data lake

    25 May 2015 | 8:58 am
    We live in an era in which we celebrate technology, we live for the latest gadgets. Data is now longer a scarce resource, expectations about what can be done with it are rising fast. On the other hand, lakes of data are overwhelming and frustrating people while hard- and software vendors are inviting us to go on a data fishing trip. They tempt us to spend many Euros on data warehouses, hardware, and state of the art analytics software. However, no matter how many Euros you’re spending, if people who work with the data don’t know how to make sense of it or are unable to clearly…
  • What’s stronger than Moore’s law?

    25 Apr 2015 | 6:58 am
    Moore’s law turned 50 this week.  In a now famous paper from 1965 Gordon Moore predicts that every 1-2  years the number of transistors on an integrated circuit will double, lowering production cost and increasing its capabilities. Even more, in the same paper Moore predicts that “integrated circuits will lead to such wonders as home computers, automatic controls for automobiles and personal portable communication equipment”. Can you imagine today’s world without them? This technological progress has boosted computational power enormously and enabled us to solve larger…
  • Do numbers really speak for themselves with big data?

    5 Apr 2015 | 11:31 am
    http://xkcd.com/1289/Chris Anderson, former editor in chief of Wired was clear about it in his provocative essay “The End of Theory: The Data Deluge Makes the Scientific Method Obsolete”. He states that with enough data, computing power and statistical algorithms we can find patterns where science cannot. No need for theory, formal methods to test validity and causation. Correlation is enough, according to Anderson and with him many others.How would this work in practice? Suppose we would like to create a prediction model for some variable Y. This could for example be the stock price of a…
  • A toast to Occam’s razor; Accuracy vs Interpretability

    10 Mar 2015 | 4:09 am
    A question that I get asked a lot these days is when selecting a predictive model how to make the trade-off between model accuracy and model interpretability. Reason for this is that methods like neural nets and random forests are becoming more popular in predictive analytics. They tend to generate more accurate predictions than traditional statistical methods like a logistic regression but are much harder to interpret. Some practitioners, following Occam’s razor principle, prefer simple methods over complex ones in supporting their customers. And I agree, most non mathematically trained…
 
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