Operations Research

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Proud of my Masters Program in OR Winning the George D Smith Prize

    ThinkOR - Think Operations Research
    Dawen
    30 Apr 2015 | 9:37 pm
    This year's INFORMS Business Analytics and Operations Research conference was held in Huntington Beach, California. Excellent talks on really relevant topics. Great conference, networking and top organizers. :)Best of all, my former masters program in Operations Research, the Centre for Operations Excellence at the Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia, won this year's George D Smith Prize. This is the field's top prize recognizing some of the best education programs.The UPS George D. Smith Prize is awarded to an academic department or program for effective and innovative…
  • domino optimization art

    Punk Rock Operations Research
    Laura McLay
    22 May 2015 | 9:56 am
    Domino opt-art version of me I discovered a picture of me in my student lab – one of the students optimized me for a class project using dominos(!)  My second blog post ever was about Bob Bosch’s optimization art – see some of his domino art here. It’s worth revisiting opt art. Bob Bosch wrote about his domino optimization models in Math Horizons, a trade journal from the Mathematical Association of America, and OR/MS Today. Bob also does other types of optimization art (TSP art, mosaic art, etc.). Let’s take a closer look at domino art. The art is created by…
  • Being Valued and Appreciated by Your Academic Institution

    RENeW
    19 May 2015 | 9:45 am
    I have had quite a few conversations at the end of this semester with faculty of different ranks.During the conversations, one of the topics that consistently emerged is that the faculty member felt that their contributions were not sufficiently recognized or valued, despite their efforts and hard work.I tried to pick my colleagues up and cheer them on but now that I am thousands of miles away in beautiful Sweden, where I consistently get my muse, I feel that the topic is of sufficient importance to write about on this blog.Especially at the end of the academic year, there are always many…
  • The Days of Show & Tell Are Over

    The Operations Blog
    Marci Reynolds
    16 May 2015 | 1:25 pm
    The days of show and tell are over. No, not the show and tell that we did back in grade school where we brought in our Show and Tell pet snake, souvenirs from vacation or science project and presented to the class. (Although, that was fun. Life was so easy back then!) I am referring to the workplace where we sometimes hold meetings for the sole purpose of “show and tell”. 1) What is a Show and Tell Meeting? A show and tell meeting is one where the communication is primarily one way and covers information that is readily available to read on your own in a report or powerpoint. As a meeting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ThinkOR - Think Operations Research

  • Proud of my Masters Program in OR Winning the George D Smith Prize

    Dawen
    30 Apr 2015 | 9:37 pm
    This year's INFORMS Business Analytics and Operations Research conference was held in Huntington Beach, California. Excellent talks on really relevant topics. Great conference, networking and top organizers. :)Best of all, my former masters program in Operations Research, the Centre for Operations Excellence at the Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia, won this year's George D Smith Prize. This is the field's top prize recognizing some of the best education programs.The UPS George D. Smith Prize is awarded to an academic department or program for effective and innovative…
  • Spam gets a personal touch: Human 1, Machine 1

    Dawen
    22 Nov 2014 | 8:46 pm
    Blogging and spamming practically come hand in hand. The obvious ones have been pretty well controlled by the major blogging platforms' spam filters, thanks to advances in text analysis and machine learning algorithms. However, it is not perfect, or is it - you be the judge in this case.This could be an example of how creative spammers are at combating algorithms.Or, it could be an example of a business owner trying to do his own selective SEO (search engine optimization).An old post on mandatory school uniforms got the following spam:I think school uniforms must be compulsory in schools…
  • What I learned from a sabbatical year

    Dawen
    10 Feb 2014 | 5:10 pm
    I spent 2013 'overlanding' through South America with my partner. 1 year, 1 continent, 1 simple car, 2 people, 13 countries, 40,000 km. After moving from Canada to the UK 5 years ago, and setting up a new life there, we gave up our jobs, salary, friends and all the comforts of life in one of the greatest metropolis in the world. A lot to let go, but we gained so much more.Above all, I learned how little I need to live on to be happy, material-wise. We converted the back of our little van into a bed, so we slept in it a lot of the nights. Wild camping at some bizarre and cool spots, like…
  • Finally Some Sense on Analytics & Data Science Job Ads

    Dawen
    23 Jan 2014 | 3:03 pm
    After yesterday's post on the state of the debate on building data science teams (individual vs team approach), it's so refreshing to stumble onto this careers page of Civis Analytics. Great example of Analytics & data science job ads done right. This page alone makes me want to apply to work there!They actually divide their jobs into: data scientist, engagement analyst, project manager, software engineer!How sensible. I like it! Nothing like the typical data science job posts, asking for "everything and the kitchen sink". This article was originally posted on ThinkOR.org. Share…
  • Building Data Science Teams: Individuals vs Team - State of the Debate So Far

    Dawen
    22 Jan 2014 | 2:59 pm
    Since my last article on "Hiring 1 Data Science unicorn is hard enough, a team is impossible. To scale means to specialise", similar ideas have been expressed by InformationWeek, McKinsey/HBR, and KDnuggets (here, here, here and here).There has a been a ton of great discussion. I attempt to summarise the viewpoints so far: Data Scientists are supposed to have some pretty deep expertise in some pretty hard areas (see diagram). Is it possible to close this talent gap when we seem to be chasing after superheroes or unicorns? (there are some, but very few)Some (44%)…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Punk Rock Operations Research

  • domino optimization art

    Laura McLay
    22 May 2015 | 9:56 am
    Domino opt-art version of me I discovered a picture of me in my student lab – one of the students optimized me for a class project using dominos(!)  My second blog post ever was about Bob Bosch’s optimization art – see some of his domino art here. It’s worth revisiting opt art. Bob Bosch wrote about his domino optimization models in Math Horizons, a trade journal from the Mathematical Association of America, and OR/MS Today. Bob also does other types of optimization art (TSP art, mosaic art, etc.). Let’s take a closer look at domino art. The art is created by…
  • just write, damn it

    Laura McLay
    4 May 2015 | 10:20 am
    I’ve had little time to write lately, so writing feels like a guilty pleasure when I have the time to do it. I am advising four PhD students who often ask me about the writing process. I’ve almost forgotten about how hard technical writing was for me back when I was in their shoes. Roger Ebert’s memoir Life Itself  jarred my memory. This weekend, I was listening to the audiobook while working on on my yard. One passage about writing got my attention: [Bill] Lyon watched as I ripped one sheet of copy paper after another out of my typewriter and finally gave me the most…
  • the NFL football draft and the knapsack problem

    Laura McLay
    30 Apr 2015 | 10:11 am
    In this week’s Advanced Football Analytics podcast, Brian Burke talked about the knapsack problem and the NFL draft [Link]. I enjoyed it. Brian has a blog post explaining the concept of the knapsack problem as it relates to the NFL draft here here. The idea is that the draft is a capital budgeting problem for each team, where the team’s salary cap space is the knapsack budget, the potential players are the items, the players’ salaries against the cap are the item weights, and the players’ values (hard to estimate!) are the item rewards. Additional constraints are…
  • tips for filling out a statistically sound bracket

    Laura McLay
    16 Mar 2015 | 6:29 am
    Go Badgers!! Here are a few things I do to fill out my bracket using analytics. 1. Let’s start with what not to do. I usually don’t put a whole lot of weight on a team’s record because strength of schedule matters. Likewise, I don’t put a whole lot of weight on bad ranking tools like RPI that do not do a good job of taking strength of schedule into account. 2. Instead of records, use sophisticated ranking tools. The seeding committee using some of these ranking tools to select the seeds, so the seeds themselves reflect strength of schedule and implicitly rank teams.
  • operations research improves school choice in Boston

    Laura McLay
    9 Mar 2015 | 12:02 pm
    Many cities allow families to choose elementary schools to address growing inequities in school instruction and performance. School choice lets families give a rank ordering of their preferred schools, and a lottery ultimately assigns students to schools. The result is that many students have to travel a long way to school, crazy bus schedules, and students on the same block who do not know each other because they go to different schools. Peng Shi at MIT (with advisor Itai Ashlagi) won the 2013 Doing Good with Good OR Award held by INFORMS with his project entitled “Guiding school…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    RENeW

  • Being Valued and Appreciated by Your Academic Institution

    19 May 2015 | 9:45 am
    I have had quite a few conversations at the end of this semester with faculty of different ranks.During the conversations, one of the topics that consistently emerged is that the faculty member felt that their contributions were not sufficiently recognized or valued, despite their efforts and hard work.I tried to pick my colleagues up and cheer them on but now that I am thousands of miles away in beautiful Sweden, where I consistently get my muse, I feel that the topic is of sufficient importance to write about on this blog.Especially at the end of the academic year, there are always many…
  • Blogging from Sweden

    16 May 2015 | 6:54 am
    It's great to be back in Sweden. Since 2012 I have been a Visiting Professor at the School of Business, Economics and Law at the University of Gothenburg and I spend about 44 days a year in the beautiful city of Gothenburg.I arrived in Gothenburg on Thursday to a day of glorious sunshine which held up even yesterday. I am living in another part of the city than I have been in the past so it is a bit too far to walk to work since I would have to walk over a long bridge. So, instead, I have a monthly pass to ride the trolleys, which I love.The trolleys (sometimes called trams here) run…
  • Photos from POMS Conference in DC

    12 May 2015 | 5:43 am
    In a previous post, I provided links to our presentations at the Production and Operations Management Society (POMS) Conference, which took place recently in Washington DC.The photos below are of my present doctoral students, Sara Saberi and Shivani Shukla, along with my most recent PhD student at the Isenberg School, Dong "Michelle" Li, who successfully defended her PhD dissertation on May 4,  plus my former PhD student, Professor Min Yu of the Pamplin School of Business at the University of Portland in Oregon.Nice to see members of the Supernetwork Team supporting one another…
  • From Ecolabelling in Fashion to Supply Chains and Freight Quality Competition

    10 May 2015 | 11:49 am
    The POMS (Production and Operations Management Society) Conference is now taking place in Washington DC.Although I could not go since this (as happened last year as well) is graduation season at UMass Amherst,  3 of my present doctoral students are there (Shivani Shukla, Sara Saberi,  and Dong Li, who defended her PhD dissertation just lat week) presenting our joint work and one former doctoral student, Professor Min Yu of the Pamplin School of Business at the University of Oregon, is as well. Two of  our papers are jount with my collabortaor in Sweden, Professor Jonas…
  • The Best Gifts for an Academic Mom on Mother's Day

    10 May 2015 | 3:30 am
    I'd like to wish all mothers out there a very Happy Mother's Day and to acknowledge all those who are no longer with us.It's been a truly fabulous week and I feel very lucky.As the Director of the Virtual Center for Supernetworks, I have the privilege and honor of working with a great team of faculty, industrial partners, and students. This past Friday, I sent out the following message to my team.  All of those recognized in the message below were or are my PhD students in Management Science at the Isenberg School with the exception of my great collaborator Professor Daniele in Italy and…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Operations Blog

  • The Days of Show & Tell Are Over

    Marci Reynolds
    16 May 2015 | 1:25 pm
    The days of show and tell are over. No, not the show and tell that we did back in grade school where we brought in our Show and Tell pet snake, souvenirs from vacation or science project and presented to the class. (Although, that was fun. Life was so easy back then!) I am referring to the workplace where we sometimes hold meetings for the sole purpose of “show and tell”. 1) What is a Show and Tell Meeting? A show and tell meeting is one where the communication is primarily one way and covers information that is readily available to read on your own in a report or powerpoint. As a meeting…
  • Why Fewer Customizations Are Good For Business

    Marci Reynolds
    2 Jan 2015 | 11:19 am
    Sales wants it customized, but operations wants it standardized. I have seen this natural conflict or push/pull relationship at every company I have worked for, from packaging supplies, to online advertising to software. Having worked in both sales and ops, I have been both the requester and the rejector. What causes this conflict? Sales people want to please customers and they often believe that providing custom options and/or all the bells and whistles that the customers ask for, is what’s best for everyone. Their perspective is often about the short term gratification and the…
  • Touch Point Leadership.. Do you inspire or repel?

    Marci Reynolds
    15 Dec 2014 | 3:05 am
    For a number of years I have been involved in initiatives to improve employee morale and engagement, and create a more positive working environment. In my gut, I have always felt like the big, complex projects or events have a much lower impact on improving this area, versus the small  things we can all do day in and day out. So, I was pleased when I came across the book called “TouchPoints: Creating Powerful Leadership Connections in the Smallest of Moments” by Douglas Conant and Mette Morgaard. A short aside… I came across this book while perusing the business section of my…
  • In Praise Of Consistency

    Marci Reynolds
    25 Nov 2014 | 4:24 am
    In my personal life, I tend to be drawn to consistent experiences. When I want something really good to drink, I go to Starbucks and get a Grande Soy Latte. It tastes the same everywhere I go. When I want a really delicious dessert, I head for the warm, chocolate cake with vanilla ice cream- rarely a bad choice!  I have my favorite brands of yogurt, wine and coffee so when I consume them, I get that consistent, good experience. I am a big fan of consistency, and it is just as important in my personal life as it is in the business world. 1) Hold The Happy Dance You may have heard the phrase…
  • 5 Best Practices To Build Trust With Employees

    Marci Reynolds
    26 Dec 2012 | 11:37 am
    When I look back at the successes and challenges of 2012, one of the key concepts that had a strong presence in my day-to-day activities and that I learned a lot about/from was “building trust with employees”. It can take one sentence, one conversation or one seemingly innocent action to completely lose the trust of your employees or colleagues. Conversely, it will take multiple conversations, consistent actions and time (and more time), to build the trust of your employees and colleagues. When it comes to building trust, there is no magic bullet, no special pill and no one week contest.
Log in